Skip to main content

Why would anyone suggest to Rob a Bank?


I know, it sounds ludicrous doesn't it? But hey, it sells, trust me, read on.

Today I was killing time so speak in Collins Booksellers. It was one of very few occasions that I have gone into a book store without an agenda. I had time to mull over the genres, places I would less frequently explore, and what happened next was like stumbling over a lost fortune.

Firstly, I found some classics, like To Kill a Mockingbird, which as we all know has made a huge come back on the brink of the anticipated publication of, Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee.

Lingering on lower shelves, places not met with the occasional eye as those placed above the mid-drift, were copies such as Miles Franklin's My Brilliant Career/My Career Goes Bung and The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith by Thomas Keneally, which I read in high school.

But it was this book When to Rob a Bank by co-authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, that caught my undivided attention. Why, I'm not completely sure? I'm not an economist, or know about economics by any stretch of the imagination, in fact, when I got home I googled the definition 'Economics' just to make sure I was on the right page and everything.

No doubt it was the title that intrigued me, and with further investigation I found the co-authors were bloggers like myself - okay - they're better bloggers - that's a given. These guys have blogged over a decade with more than 8,000 blog posts - what an effort. They built their blog following the publication of their first book Freakonomics which by the way sold more than 7 million copies, hence they have never looked back.

It would be an understatement to say these two guys have a passion for what they do. Their successes have kept them blogging with their own admission,
...there wasn't any evidence the blog helped sell more copies of our books. In fact it may have cannibalized sales, since every day we were giving away our writing.

I can't wait to read past the intro of What Do Blogs and Bottled Water Have in Common?
I'm un-willing to do a spoiler alert on this one; you'll just have to read the book like myself to find out the answer.
And if I have learned one lesson today, then I've learned several. Blog well, not just good content, but relevant content; great content). Blog like there's no tomorrow, be savvy, be unpredictable, and you too might very well publish your own book one day from blog posts.

Popular posts from this blog

How to be a book reviewer by Allena Tapia

Hi bloggers, I am currently looking at book reviewing as my most current interest topic of writing, and came across this article by Allena Tapia which I found to give some very sound advice as far as starting out on the book reviewing platform. I wanted to share this as well as keep it close on hand for reference. If this is an area you're also interested in I hope it helps. Reviews can of course be new titles and older, I guess the focus would be on newer titles, but older titles / classics are in my opinion just as good to plug a book that resonates with you and could offer another reader some great reading. Start your platform with Goodreads and build your audience. Hope to hear from you guys on these platforms. Meredith 01 First, Act Like a Book Reviewer: Review Books, A LOT
•••
Being a paid book reviewer likely sounds like a plum job for many writers, who generally love reading as much as writing. Despite this, it's certainly not a pipe dream. Seriously, I'm a real…

Picnic At Hanging Rock

The return of an all time classic, Picnic At Hanging Rock, has now been  re-mastered and made into a mini-series that has everyone talking.
 The story revisits when a private girls boarding school in Victoria in 1900 plans a picnic on St Valentine's Day at Macedon's Hanging Rock.  Following lunch amid the afternoon, four of the girls, Miranda, Edith, Irma and Marion, set off to explore and climb the Hanging Rock with their teacher Ms McCraw. In an unexplained dream-like event, everyone except Edith vanishes 'into the rock'. The biggest mystery is when Edith returns to the group in hysterics and can't detail or explain what happened, sending the surrounding town into mayhem. When the public and police search for the missing girls; Irma is found unconscious but unharmed at the rock. From there the story takes on major twists and plots including students and staff leaving unexpectedly; a schoolgirl committing suicide and the headmistress jumping off Hanging Rock, killing …

Author Interview with Nancy Chadwick for San Francisco Book Review

Interview With Nancy Chadwick, author of Under the Birch Tree by Meredith Grant | Jun 13, 2018 | Author Interviews, Written


I had the pleasure of reading and reviewing Under the Birch Tree for San Francisco Book Review. Below is the written interview with Nancy on her upcoming publication this month, I hope you enjoy Nancy's insights and experiences she shares with us.
What first inspired you to write your story?
There was something about trees. When I was a young girl, maybe eight or ten, I was a walker who enjoyed the outdoors, just roaming around and exploring. I liked to walk around the perimeter of my house, starting and ending at the front where my favorite tree, a birch, grew. I loved that tree, especially because of how it looked with its peeling white bark and wavy slender leaves. It always reminded me of home; they were one and the same. I felt strongly about establishing one’s roots and a sense of belonging and home that my early steps around the foundation of my home be…