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Picnic At Hanging Rock

The return of an all time classic, Picnic At Hanging Rock, has now been  re-mastered and made into a mini-series that has everyone talking.
 The story revisits when a private girls boarding school in Victoria in 1900 plans a picnic on St Valentine's Day at Macedon's Hanging Rock.  Following lunch amid the afternoon, four of the girls, Miranda, Edith, Irma and Marion, set off to explore and climb the Hanging Rock with their teacher Ms McCraw. In an unexplained dream-like event, everyone except Edith vanishes 'into the rock'. The biggest mystery is when Edith returns to the group in hysterics and can't detail or explain what happened, sending the surrounding town into mayhem. When the public and police search for the missing girls; Irma is found unconscious but unharmed at the rock. From there the story takes on major twists and plots including students and staff leaving unexpectedly; a schoolgirl committing suicide and the headmistress jumping off Hanging Rock, killing …
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How to be a book reviewer by Allena Tapia

Hi bloggers, I am currently looking at book reviewing as my most current interest topic of writing, and came across this article by Allena Tapia which I found to give some very sound advice as far as starting out on the book reviewing platform. I wanted to share this as well as keep it close on hand for reference. If this is an area you're also interested in I hope it helps. Reviews can of course be new titles and older, I guess the focus would be on newer titles, but older titles / classics are in my opinion just as good to plug a book that resonates with you and could offer another reader some great reading. Start your platform with Goodreads and build your audience. Hope to hear from you guys on these platforms. Meredith 01 First, Act Like a Book Reviewer: Review Books, A LOT
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Being a paid book reviewer likely sounds like a plum job for many writers, who generally love reading as much as writing. Despite this, it's certainly not a pipe dream. Seriously, I'm a real…

New book review - 'Wild' by Cheryl Strayed

Hi everyone, just letting you know I have posted my review of Cheryl Strayed's 'Wild.'  To find it just head over to my page What I'm reading.  Hope you enjoy it.

The Little Library - Melbourne

Stumbled across this unique idea through a facebook post by Humans in Melbourne. 

Yes, it's a community library where any one can visit, sit, read, relax, meet other people, talk, learn and borrow or swap books all on an honesty system.

Although it's not purely just for those who may be homeless, it certainly breaks down barriers allowing anyone from any walk of life to go in without feeling as though they don't belong, or can't afford its luxury.

Located within Melbourne Central, on Level 2, you could be excused for almost passing without noticing; myself included.

Inside you'll see what looks like a bookstore, but it is so much more. The Little Library is a place where absolutely anyone can come and borrow or swap a book for free. There is no membership, there is no shopkeeper or security guard, it is all done on honesty.

I would hope every major city could invest in utilising a space to provide this same concept for their own locals. Wow, what food for thought!

SHORT FICTION - LOCAL COLOR

Recently I was lucky enough to try my hand at a new technique of writing called Regionalism and local color in short fiction
I hope that wasn't a sigh I heard? 

Anyway, this new opportunity meant research, another new concept for me for most of my writing is strongly non-fictional, but I was ready for something different, ready for a new challenge and who knows I might pull something great off.

For those who don't know what 'Regionalism and local color' writing is, here's a little bit about it. 

By definition, local color is defined as the characteristics and traits that make a location unique, like the gold fields - as I happened to choose for my story.  It's about the food shops and attitudes of the people in a town.

Local color stories concentrate on landscape, dialect like that found in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, it's about customs and folklore specific to geographic region or locale.  It's said that the setting can be so inte…

Bookshop of Kabul- Bookshops Of the World

The Bookseller of Kabul was one of many books listed on my bucket list of books to read and quickly became one of my many favorite reads.

This post was inspired by The Bookseller of Kabul, with real photo's of the bookshop itself.  Pictured opposite is the real man behind the story Shah Muhammad Rais.

Yes it's an International bestseller, but what I've come to learn since having read this extraordinary book first published in 2002 is how much controversy the Author Asne Seierstad caused due to telling the story of Sultan Khan (Shah Muhammad Rais).
It surprises me that Shah Muhammad Rais found this account of his life so incorrectly depicted, especially when the Author shared four months of her life in Shah's home to write of his and his families experiences as Afghani's. How welcoming they had been, how open, honest they were with Asne, and how careful Asne consciously made the effort in telling their story through their own words and feelings.

Asne writes the fore…

Bookshops of the World

Shakespeare & Company Paris- Most photographed bookstore in the world!
A Brief History of a Parisian Bookstore
"I created this bookstore like a man would write a novel, building each room like a chapter, and I like people to open the door the way they open a book, a book that leads into a magic world in their imaginations." —George Whitman
I just love George Whitman's definition of how he came to "create" this bookstore, it conjures an immediate imagination of your own, one where you can see rooms filled with favorite genre's, favorite all-time classics just waiting for your presence, to spot them silently awaiting your perusal, your excitement in meeting them, in stepping through into a universe of it's very own - and how wonderful does that feel.

Shakespeare and Company is an English-language bookshop located in the heart of Paris, on the banks of the Seine, opposite Notre-Dame. Since opening in 1951, it’s been a meeting place for English speaking …